[logo]
IF-Review
The Online Interactive Fiction Review Site


Earn $20!Current ReviewGame ListAuthor ListReviewer ListRecent Reviews

 
Death Becomes You
Review by: Paul O'Brian
Game: Lock & Key
By: Adam Cadre

Related Links
Game file
Info at Baf's guide

[NOTE: Lock & Key has a twist right at the beginning, and I'm going to give it away because it's not practical to discuss the game without doing so. So if you haven't played it yet and you want to be surprised, go play it before reading this, at least up to the twist anyway.]

I love editing SPAG, but the job does have its down-sides. For instance, I'm frequently obliged to read reviews of games I haven't played yet. Most of the time, this isn't much of a problem, since SPAG reviews are required to be spoiler-free. However, there is a small, occasional section of the 'zine called SPAG Specifics, wherein reviewers are allowed to spoil as much as they like in the interest of promoting specific, detailed discussion about particular games. When I get a review for this section, I need to read it whether I've played the game in question or not.

That's exactly what happened to me with Lock & Key -- I'd played the game enough to get beyond the initial twist, see the setup, say "Cool", and vaguely resolve to play it whenever I found the time. Shortly afterward, Eytan Zweig submitted a thoughtful, fairly critical review of the game for SPAG Specifics, and I decided that I wanted to wait a while to play the game after that, so that the review would fade enough in memory that it wouldn't color my perceptions. Now it's been about a year since that issue, Lock & Key has just won a handful of XYZZY Awards, and I have a new laptop I needed to test this past weekend; the stars were aligned, and I finished the game.

I wasn't disappointed. Cadre's writing shines as usual, as does his knack for giving every game a fresh angle. In this one, you play a prison designer and security expert in a mildly jokey pseudo-medieval milieu. Your job is to craft the perfect sequence of death-traps for the King's dungeon, enough to defeat even the hardiest adventurer who might try to escape it. If you succeed, you'll make a fortune and be able to retire. If you fail, well, you get beheaded. Those medieval managers really knew how to motivate their employees.

The meat of the game is its one and only puzzle, the one for which it earned the XYZZY for Best Individual Puzzle: setting the traps. It's not that setting the traps themselves is all that difficult, but choosing the right ones... ah, that's another matter. See, once you've finished constructing your ideal dungeon, it is put to the test by Boldo, a thick-thewed adventurer who, in the best IF fashion, seems to have an endless inventory of items that happen to counteract your traps perfectly. Every time he encounters a death-trap, you get to see exactly how he defeats it, and this in turn allows you to begin scheming about how you might deprive him of that method. Like Varicella, the game is highly iterative -- the chances you'll beat it the first time through are virtually nil, and this is by design. Instead, Boldo's many triumphs allow you to make your own advances towards building the perfect dungeon upon restarting.

It's a deeply rewarding puzzle of marvelously interlocking elements. Not only does it operate on several levels to begin with, it builds on itself to make lots of little "aha!" moments combine into a greater experience of overall insight. In addition, the game's use of graphics do it a great service, presenting a clean and attractive game board to help players to see exactly what choices they've made.

My favorite part of the puzzle, though, is the hinting. The prose that describes Boldo conquering your traps is funny and enjoyable to read on its own merits, but it also frequently contains wonderfully subtle hints about how the dungeon might be better constructed. For the sake of spoiler-avoidance, I won't quote any of those hints here, but I will say that they capture the feel that Infocom at its best was able to provide, of prose that is just as good on a game level as it is on a story level.

So Lock & Key wholly deserved its XYZZY for Best Puzzle. The other awards, I'm not so sure about. At the end of the XYZZYs, Lock & Key went away with the prizes for both Best Individual NPC (Boldo) and Best NPCs in general. The fact that it won these accolades for NPCs with whom (for the most part) the player cannot directly interact AT ALL is rather astonishing. I'm not sure what to make of it. Perhaps writing is just much, much more important than coding when it comes to NPCs, at least as far as the XYZZY voters are concerned. Certainly Boldo reacts to the traps placed by the player, and the descriptions of his reactions are all great and funny, but that's a very limited sort of interaction, nothing at all like the dozens and dozens of responses that make up the typical fully-fleshed IF NPC. I wonder: can great writing alone make a great NPC?

Maybe sometimes it can, but I've yet to see it. Certainly this game's excellent writing didn't make Boldo an excellent NPC. He's simply a cipher, an intentionally broad cliche whom the PC never meets, instead only watching cut-scenes of him on a sort of magic TV. He's entertaining enough for the purpose he serves, but he hardly feels like a deeply implemented NPC, though he's the deepest of the bunch. The other NPCs -- the King, a gladiator named Musculo, and a host of others who appear in brief cameos -- are present only in cut-scenes. The only exception to this, the only NPC who even responds to "ASK", is the guard at the beginning. His response: "No talking in the dungeon!"

I would contend that the really remarkable character in Lock & Key is the player character. What's remarkable about him? [1] Why, his cleverness, of course -- his ability to string together just the right combination of traps to defeat Boldo. More to the point, what's remarkable is the way in which the game constructs this cleverness. Like Primo Varicella, the PC of Lock & Key is what I'll call an accretive PC, meaning that he becomes more and more himself with each iteration of the game, as the player's knowledge accretes.

In most IF games, your character will never live up to you -- it will never be able to do most of the things you can think of, nor say most of the things you can say. This is still true of Lock & Key and Varicella, but in an important way, what's also true of those games is that you must live up to your character. You're told a salient quality about the PC at the outset of the game -- his expertise in dungeon design, or his Machiavellian plan to take over the regency -- and then you must take him through one iteration after another until you yourself have attained enough of that quality to guide the PC to a successful conclusion. When you finally do reach that conclusion, it's as if you've finally learned the real story, and all the failed attempts leading up to it exist only in shadowy parallel universes. This is who the character was all along -- it just took you a while to catch up with him.

Of course, the case could be made that all IF PCs are like this to some degree. That may be true, but then again it's de rigueur in most other IF to avoid game designs in which the PC must learn something by dying. Graham Nelson even made it Rule Number Three in his Player's Bill Of Rights. [2] Of course, when a player must be able to step successfully into the PC's viewpoint without any previous knowledge whatsoever, it becomes rather hard to give that PC any sort of expertise in the game world, which is why we so frequently see PCs who suffer from amnesia, or are fish-out-of-water, or other such tricks. Lock & Key and Varicella break this rule so brilliantly that it doesn't even seem like a valid rule anymore. Why shouldn't the player learn from past lives? After all, unless the PC is placed in some sort of contrived situation to deprive her of all her natural knowledge, she'll inevitably know more than the player does the first time that player begins the game.

After a while, the requirement to match the PC's knowledge with the player's can begin to feel like a bit of a cage, and the most common contortions an IF game goes through to live inside it (such as amnesia) have long since lost their appeal. Even the freshest ones can still feel a bit tired and gimmicky unless done exactly right. The accretive PC is one key to this cage -- it's wonderfully refreshing to play a character who's really good at something, and even better to become good at it yourself. Of all the jail-breaks that happen in Lock & Key, this one is the most satisfying.

---

[1] I'm referring to the PC as a male for convenience's sake -- I don't recall its gender ever being specified in the game.

[2] See his excellent article The Craft Of Adventure, available in the info directory of the IF Archive.

  Geo Visitors Map


This site Copyright 2001-2012 by Mark J. Musante. All Rights Reserved
Individual reviews are copyrighted by their respective authors.